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How do I tell Linux lite to skip the internal Hard and go in a partition

I'm looking at the Install Guide I will install Linux Lite to my external hard drive. But I don't want to erase Zorin OS. I have a partition already made that it can go into. The problem is How do I tell Linux lite to skip the internal hard drive and go into that partition on the external hard drive?

* Note

The way I first started doing this strange thing is something that some linux users don't agree about. I used my desktop computer so that I could easily disconnect the internal hard drive and then I used the default installer. Some linux people have told me doing this is fine "This is not windows and I do it all the time." lol While other Linux users told me this mythod is bad. "Your going to get a crap shoot of drivers" Who has got this right? I don't think it's good for the desktop to constantly be disconnecting power plugs just so I can get Linux to go where I want it to go. I've had some Linux people tell me "What your doing isn't natural" Eh real nice of them. :p Then you got the other side "Linux is the customisers dream you can do whatever you want" roles eyes. I've had people tell me "Just use a VM machine." That's somethine else I need to learn but really if it's going to be that hard and time consuming it's no wonder more people isn't making the switch to Linux.

Once your an advanced user I can see how you would love to make VM machines. It's probably fun to try out multiple distros and stuff. But for a new user like myself that stuff is still well over my head. And you also got to consider time. Some people like myself work a very tiring 8 hour job. Other people got lots of time to just sit in front of a computer and experiment.

Now I'm going to contrast my experience.
I've used the desktop to install Zorin and then run it from my laptop. I've used my laptop to install it, and run it from my Laptop. Either way things seem to work the same. I get the same errors during install. LOL I experience the same bugs during operation. But I also have some really good days too. I'm typing you this from Zorin, and none of the small bugs kept me from getting done what I needed to get done. Soooooooooo In that respect it isn't so bad.

PS you can't run this Zorin hard drive on the desktop. The desktop won't boot up the external hard drive. Even if I could get it to boot it up, I couldn't get online with it. That will be another thread.
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Comments

  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    If I understand your situation correctly, Zorin is already on an external hd. Is that correct? if so, you will first need to make space for the next distro. A tool like gparted will work just fine. Then you can install the next distro to the free space. Then YOU MUST install the boot loader to the master file table of the external. This way, if you have an os of any sort on your internal hd, it will display the options relevent to the external drive. Also, make sure you have your system's bios set to boot from an external hd first (meaning, before the internal) if you do this correctly, you should get a boot menu listing all the os's on the system. Now, if you want the new os to automatically mount partitions used by other os, that's another issue entirely. All you need do is amend a couple of lines to the /etc/fstab file (as root) If that's the case, I can help you with that as well.
  • wchouser3 wrote:
    If I understand your situation correctly, Zorin is already on an external hd. Is that correct? if so, you will first need to make space for the next distro. A tool like gparted will work just fine. Then you can install the next distro to the free space. Then YOU MUST install the boot loader to the master file table of the external. This way, if you have an os of any sort on your internal hd, it will display the options relevent to the external drive. Also, make sure you have your system's bios set to boot from an external hd first (meaning, before the internal) if you do this correctly, you should get a boot menu listing all the os's on the system. Now, if you want the new os to automatically mount partitions used by other os, that's another issue entirely. All you need do is amend a couple of lines to the /etc/fstab file (as root) If that's the case, I can help you with that as well.

    Thank you. I may need your help with /etc/fstab.

    I decided to do away with Zorin. That thing has just been way too buggy for me. :( I'm currently installing AV Linux and Linux Lite to the same hard drive. I'm giving it a try, but I don't know if this will work. I put AV Linux on the Hard Drive first, and then Linux Lite. That way I could avoid some of the extra gparted stuff.
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    if you don't mind me asking, Why are you putting two similar distros on one hd?

    Anyway, there's no reason for it not to work as long as you left some free space when you installed AV Linux. Also, it's a good idea to study up on partitioning, and editing an fstab. For example: in your case, if you created a seperate partation for your home directory in AV Linux, you could have Linux Lite mount that same drive as it's home directory. That way you only have one place for all your settings, pictures, music, etc.
  • wchouser3 wrote:
    if you don't mind me asking, Why are you putting two similar distros on one hd?

    Anyway, there's no reason for it not to work as long as you left some free space when you installed AV Linux. Also, it's a good idea to study up on partitioning, and editing an fstab. For example: in your case, if you created a seperate partation for your home directory in AV Linux, you could have Linux Lite mount that same drive as it's home directory. That way you only have one place for all your settings, pictures, music, etc.

    As dumb as it must sound, People online keep telling me to try Linux Lite. I kinda looked at Linux Lite and it doesn't feel right for me. But since I haven't installed it and used it for a while... I just wanted to give it a try. My personal view is you can't know how an Operating System is going to work until it's on your hardware for a while. I mean some Operating Sytems really degrade with time. Zorin starts out good but give it a few weeks and you'll notice the bugs.

    I like AV Linux because I love editing audio and video.

    People probably wonder, Why don't you just stick it on your internal hard drive? The answer to that is Microsoft windows and weird partitions that I'm afraid to mess up. I mean sure I made DVD restore discs, but do I really have all that I need? I really can't say. I'm not going clone the internal drive because my Windows 7 has a quirk that I should re install it sometime soon. (You can't make zip files from the file manager)

    Ive been messing around with Linux for a while now, and I'm really starting to get frustrated to the point where I'm asking myself. "if it's this hard then why am I doing it?" I keep having this going through my head too "if only I had a friend in real life that could help me"
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    wchouser3 wrote:
    if you don't mind me asking, Why are you putting two similar distros on one hd?

    Anyway, there's no reason for it not to work as long as you left some free space when you installed AV Linux. Also, it's a good idea to study up on partitioning, and editing an fstab. For example: in your case, if you created a seperate partation for your home directory in AV Linux, you could have Linux Lite mount that same drive as it's home directory. That way you only have one place for all your settings, pictures, music, etc.

    As dumb as it must sound, People online keep telling me to try Linux Lite. I kinda looked at Linux Lite and it doesn't feel right for me. But since I haven't installed it and used it for a while... I just wanted to give it a try. My personal view is you can't know how an Operating System is going to work until it's on your hardware for a while. I mean some Operating Sytems really degrade with time. Zorin starts out good but give it a few weeks and you'll notice the bugs.

    I like AV Linux because I love editing audio and video.

    People probably wonder, Why don't you just stick it on your internal hard drive? The answer to that is Microsoft windows and weird partitions that I'm afraid to mess up. I mean sure I made DVD restore discs, but do I really have all that I need? I really can't say. I'm not going clone the internal drive because my Windows 7 has a quirk that I should re install it sometime soon. (You can't make zip files from the file manager)

    Ive been messing around with Linux for a while now, and I'm really starting to get frustrated to the point where I'm asking myself. "if it's this hard then why am I doing it?" I keep having this going through my head too "if only I had a friend in real life that could help me"

    The extra partitions you're referring to are usually created by the computer manufacturer, and as such, usually one of the first things I get rid of. A fresh Windows 64 bit install creates three partitions; the root partition, a system reserved, and a recovery. It's absolutely safe to get rid of anything else.

    I agree with what you said about keeping it on the system for a while before switching. Most people would install it to a virtual box to test it, which is fine for exploring the distro and trying out it's features, but not so good for determining device compatibility.

    I'm a big A/V guy too. For my money, the Arch based systems are the winner. The problem with the debian based distros is that to get the best software, eventually you have to install a third party repository or two. AV Linux took care of all that for you. Ubuntu Studio is also a solid choice.
  • wchouser3 wrote:
    wchouser3 wrote:
    if you don't mind me asking, Why are you putting two similar distros on one hd?

    Anyway, there's no reason for it not to work as long as you left some free space when you installed AV Linux. Also, it's a good idea to study up on partitioning, and editing an fstab. For example: in your case, if you created a seperate partation for your home directory in AV Linux, you could have Linux Lite mount that same drive as it's home directory. That way you only have one place for all your settings, pictures, music, etc.

    As dumb as it must sound, People online keep telling me to try Linux Lite. I kinda looked at Linux Lite and it doesn't feel right for me. But since I haven't installed it and used it for a while... I just wanted to give it a try. My personal view is you can't know how an Operating System is going to work until it's on your hardware for a while. I mean some Operating Sytems really degrade with time. Zorin starts out good but give it a few weeks and you'll notice the bugs.

    I like AV Linux because I love editing audio and video.

    People probably wonder, Why don't you just stick it on your internal hard drive? The answer to that is Microsoft windows and weird partitions that I'm afraid to mess up. I mean sure I made DVD restore discs, but do I really have all that I need? I really can't say. I'm not going clone the internal drive because my Windows 7 has a quirk that I should re install it sometime soon. (You can't make zip files from the file manager)

    Ive been messing around with Linux for a while now, and I'm really starting to get frustrated to the point where I'm asking myself. "if it's this hard then why am I doing it?" I keep having this going through my head too "if only I had a friend in real life that could help me"

    The extra partitions you're referring to are usually created by the computer manufacturer, and as such, usually one of the first things I get rid of. A fresh Windows 64 bit install creates three partitions; the root partition, a system reserved, and a recovery. It's absolutely safe to get rid of anything else.

    I agree with what you said about keeping it on the system for a while before switching. Most people would install it to a virtual box to test it, which is fine for exploring the distro and trying out it's features, but not so good for determining device compatibility.

    I'm a big A/V guy too. For my money, the Arch based systems are the winner. The problem with the debian based distros is that to get the best software, eventually you have to install a third party repository or two. AV Linux took care of all that for you. Ubuntu Studio is also a solid choice.

    LOL at least someone agrees with the idea behind my method.

    I decided that I don't like AV Linux. I managed to get it to install, but man, it requires two user names and two passwords. I think that is probably the nature of debian. But it's kinda hard to remember two user names and two passwords. In fact after I booted into it, I couldn't log in at all. I don't know if I miss typed my password or what. But I ended up re installing it again, and this time I wrote down all the information. In my opinion that one is a pain. Of course if your really good at Arch I'm sure that part would come easy for you. But for me between the installer that made me manually partition out the drive, and then the double user names and passwords etc. It really made my experience of setting it up bad. Then after I got it going, I started looking around for a Gui updater. Since I couldn't find one of those, I started looking around online on how to update. I didn't find any information about that. So I just tried something on my own in the terminal, and found out that it wouldn't recognize my password. I thought to myself, Hey I got it written down, why doesn't this thing take one of them? Sooo, I used windows to delete it from the hard disk.

    I'm taking a break from Linux. I've told other people, in the forums, as well as in the chats, with as many problems as I've had with Linux. There is a strong chance I'm done with it. One guy commented "Linux isn't for everyone" and someone Else said, "You need a Linux Buddy"

    I've been looking for a group around here, but I don't think there is one. The closes thing to me is a 3 hour drive away. I signed up on their website. I don't know if they accepted me or not. But the bottom line is, unless I can find someone who can show me what I'm doing wrong or what is wrong with my hardware and Linux combination, I'm done with it.

    Some might think this is a hasty decision. But really it isn't because I've been trying off and on ever since 1999, and I got more serious about it in 2006, but it's been just one big hard battle the whole way.
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    I would agree with the people who say that it's not for everyone. Indeed if I didn't make a huge number of mistakes (some of which granaded my entire installation, causing me to have to re-install) I wouldn't know what I do today. I literally have nobody to share Linux with outside of the forums, a couple of facebook buddies, and some people I follow on YouTube.

    The one thing that did give me motivation is watching some YouTube videos. If you find this kind of thing interesting, there's some really awesome vids out there. If you care to give it a try, here's a few people you should look up on Youtube:

    Nixie Pixel (OS Alt)
    Spatry (Spatry's Cup of Linux)
    Quidsup (he just does distro reviews, but he does the best ones)
    Infinately Galactic
    midfingr

    have a look at some of those. Start with Spatry's Cup of Linux. He's just about as enthusiastic as anyone can be about linux without having to be medicated. (which...sometimes I wonder about him)......I'll tell you what.....here's the links:











    I have found Youtube to be the most valuable source of information...period. Often times you can find videos specifically related to a problem your having. These people are excited about Linux and love to help.

    Before you give up for good: Do me a favor, and try one more thing. Go to spatry's videos and watch a couple from his series called "Manjaro Mania." Try that distro. They say it's a bit more of an advanced distro, but in my opinion, It's easier than the Debian, and Ubuntu based distros. For Two reasons: One, It's a rolling release, meaning you never have to re-install...every time you update, you have the newest system. And two, Manjaro is based on ArchLinux, which means you have two ways of installing software, The stock repos, and the "Arch User Repository" This is better than Debian, and Ubuntu, because there is never any need to track down third party repositories for packages not found in the stock repositories.

    Let me know what you think
  • wchouser3 wrote:
    I would agree with the people who say that it's not for everyone. Indeed if I didn't make a huge number of mistakes (some of which granaded my entire installation, causing me to have to re-install) I wouldn't know what I do today. I literally have nobody to share Linux with outside of the forums, a couple of facebook buddies, and some people I follow on YouTube.

    The one thing that did give me motivation is watching some YouTube videos. If you find this kind of thing interesting, there's some really awesome vids out there. If you care to give it a try, here's a few people you should look up on Youtube:

    Nixie Pixel (OS Alt)
    Spatry (Spatry's Cup of Linux)
    Quidsup (he just does distro reviews, but he does the best ones)
    Infinately Galactic
    midfingr

    have a look at some of those. Start with Spatry's Cup of Linux. He's just about as enthusiastic as anyone can be about linux without having to be medicated. (which...sometimes I wonder about him)......I'll tell you what.....here's the links:











    I have found Youtube to be the most valuable source of information...period. Often times you can find videos specifically related to a problem your having. These people are excited about Linux and love to help.

    Before you give up for good: Do me a favor, and try one more thing. Go to spatry's videos and watch a couple from his series called "Manjaro Mania." Try that distro. They say it's a bit more of an advanced distro, but in my opinion, It's easier than the Debian, and Ubuntu based distros. For Two reasons: One, It's a rolling release, meaning you never have to re-install...every time you update, you have the newest system. And two, Manjaro is based on ArchLinux, which means you have two ways of installing software, The stock repos, and the "Arch User Repository" This is better than Debian, and Ubuntu, because there is never any need to track down third party repositories for packages not found in the stock repositories.

    Let me know what you think

    That's great advice! You deserve a pat on the back.

    I've been to those channels, and I got two usb sticks full of those videos. Your right that is the best source of information. :)

    When I first started linux in 1999, I couldn't install it. I managed to mess up a MBR. LOL I did a low level format on an IDE hard drive and then was told by my teacher that is a no no. lol But it was the only way I could get the MBR working for Dos again.

    My next trouble was I couldn't get online. Ubuntu is a really easy distro to make a duel boot system. I had an old computer that I could install it with with windows 98. Everything with the install went smooth. But I couldn't get ubuntu to mount the floppy drive for anything. And I couldn't get online. I was on dial up at the time, and the set up CD was only for windows. That was a deal breaker.

    The next time I tried. I made a duel boot Vista/ubuntu machine. Again I couldn't get ubuntu to go online. At the time I had to use a Verizon Wireless USB thing. I searched all over the place online and it seemed like the answer to that set up was no. Verizon only made a setup CD for Windows and Mac. If you didn't use their manager, you couldn't get online. Some really smart guys, did some odd ball work around, but they ended up with something that scared them. What I mean is, yes they got online, but they couldn't tell how they were going to get charged for it. (By the minute or by data) They were in other words bypassing the manager program.

    It wasn't until a new internet service provider came to town that I could finally get Linux online.

    I'll take another look at Manjaro :)

    Thank you for your suggestions and encouragement. The encouragement part has been much needed for someone like me. :)
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    that's not a problem.

    yea, back in the early days of Ubuntu and such, hardware support just wasn't what it is now. We have better tools now to detect hardware. Your internet problem was likely because you needed to install a driver. Now, in order to mount drives you have to have a package called "gvfs" if you use a "complete" desktop like KDE, or Gnome, it should come right out of the box. Or, if you have a "complete" distro like Manjaro, Ubuntu, Mint, you should have it as well. I'm not sure if that was the case in the early days.

    I bought my first computer back in 2002, It came with XP. My neighbor was one of those super-freak nerds with an entire room devoted to computers. I remember he ran RedHat Linux. He tried to share some of it with me, but it went so far over my head, there was just no way. About a year later, I played around with OpenSuse, but I couldn't get it to go online because in those days I used America Online, and AOL provided no support, and I didn't know how to get a dial-up modem to work with the AOL Software. Fast forward 6 years. I now had a couple of machines that didn't run Vista so well, and I didn't want to spend the money on anything else. That's when I tried Ubuntu for the first time. I was hooked! Mainly because it requires no antivirus, and it made the system run faster than I ever knew. Since then, I've made it a hobby trying out new distros and learning about Linux. This journey has brought me to Arch.

    Arch took me about a month just to learn how to install it. There's no graphical installer, and you get nothing but the shell, once it's installed, but it's the best way to build a system from scratch, tailored to a person's liking. I've since slowed my exploration of others distros and focused more on helping users get the most out of their Linux installation.

    If you stick it out, you'll learn how rewarding it is to finally "get it." It's a good feeling when you finally figure out how to get it to work right.
  • wchouser3 wrote:
    that's not a problem.

    yea, back in the early days of Ubuntu and such, hardware support just wasn't what it is now. We have better tools now to detect hardware. Your internet problem was likely because you needed to install a driver. Now, in order to mount drives you have to have a package called "gvfs" if you use a "complete" desktop like KDE, or Gnome, it should come right out of the box. Or, if you have a "complete" distro like Manjaro, Ubuntu, Mint, you should have it as well. I'm not sure if that was the case in the early days.

    I bought my first computer back in 2002, It came with XP. My neighbor was one of those super-freak nerds with an entire room devoted to computers. I remember he ran RedHat Linux. He tried to share some of it with me, but it went so far over my head, there was just no way. About a year later, I played around with OpenSuse, but I couldn't get it to go online because in those days I used America Online, and AOL provided no support, and I didn't know how to get a dial-up modem to work with the AOL Software. Fast forward 6 years. I now had a couple of machines that didn't run Vista so well, and I didn't want to spend the money on anything else. That's when I tried Ubuntu for the first time. I was hooked! Mainly because it requires no antivirus, and it made the system run faster than I ever knew. Since then, I've made it a hobby trying out new distros and learning about Linux. This journey has brought me to Arch.

    Arch took me about a month just to learn how to install it. There's no graphical installer, and you get nothing but the shell, once it's installed, but it's the best way to build a system from scratch, tailored to a person's liking. I've since slowed my exploration of others distros and focused more on helping users get the most out of their Linux installation.

    If you stick it out, you'll learn how rewarding it is to finally "get it." It's a good feeling when you finally figure out how to get it to work right.


    Thank you for sharing your story. :)

    I only have one thing to add. Evidently I forgot to mention something about the Verizon wireless problem. Ubuntu showed me the device, it gave me the complete name of the device, so I know it detected it. But Verizon had a special program for managing the device. The way I understand it is, originally Verizon provided that program for Linux. But they decided to drop the support for Linux. I saw some people in the forums talking about how there was a program and now there is not. Whenever they contacted Verizon about the issue, they would respond "we don't support Linux"

    Thankfully I don't haft to use Verizon anymore. That company pretty much does whatever they want and you got to come along with it.

    When I first signed up, I had unlimited internet access. After a few years they decided to change it to limited internet access. An acquaintance of mine worked for Verizon Wireless. Anyone that was still on the unlimited deal got there internet access slowed down to the point it would no longer work. When He found out I was having trouble, he told me to call him. Then He told me everything. In order for me to get my speed back, I had to make the switch to Limited Access. What that means is they gave you a data limit per month. If you went over you had to pay more for your access.
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    Yea, Verizon was one of the first to see the writing on the wall. The problem was that people were starting to realize they could teather their laptops to their phones and stuff like that. Sales of home internet service started to suffer. Another thing was that the release of these high-speed devices, including the little usb sticks (I have a T-Mobile one) did not necessarily co-inside with the infrastructure development. In other-words, they weren't building the towers fast enough to keep up with the usage. I have a friend that works down at Indiana University. He's one of the guys that handles the library network for the entire state. In those days, he always had high-end devices, he believed he was "grandfathered" meaning that he would be able to keep his unlimited, unthrottled access. That turned out to be wrong.

    I notice now, when I have NetworkManger installed, and I plug in the T-Moble USB stick, The system recognizes the device as "Mobile Broadband" though I've never tried to make it work. It wouldn't surprise me if every one out there except Verizon worked. Their attitude toward Linux is less than favorable (they believe we're a bunch of hackers) One thing that does work though is tethering. I have on several occasions used my son's Verizon iPhone as a wifi hotspot. Now there's two companies who's attitude toward the open-source universe leaves much to be desired.
  • wchouser3 wrote:
    Yea, Verizon was one of the first to see the writing on the wall. The problem was that people were starting to realize they could teather their laptops to their phones and stuff like that. Sales of home internet service started to suffer. Another thing was that the release of these high-speed devices, including the little usb sticks (I have a T-Mobile one) did not necessarily co-inside with the infrastructure development. In other-words, they weren't building the towers fast enough to keep up with the usage. I have a friend that works down at Indiana University. He's one of the guys that handles the library network for the entire state. In those days, he always had high-end devices, he believed he was "grandfathered" meaning that he would be able to keep his unlimited, unthrottled access. That turned out to be wrong.

    I notice now, when I have NetworkManger installed, and I plug in the T-Moble USB stick, The system recognizes the device as "Mobile Broadband" though I've never tried to make it work. It wouldn't surprise me if every one out there except Verizon worked. Their attitude toward Linux is less than favorable (they believe we're a bunch of hackers) One thing that does work though is tethering. I have on several occasions used my son's Verizon iPhone as a wifi hotspot. Now there's two companies who's attitude toward the open-source universe leaves much to be desired.

    Thank for your comment on Verizon. Thank you for showing me that I'm not going crazy. :)

    I have an update:

    I downloaded these, that way I can take a look at them.

    Manijaro_zps6f048f54.jpg

    I agree what you said about Spatry. He's a little over top at times. I also think they (meaning the other hosts) should be a little more careful about the way they go about recommending Distros. Take Zorin for an example, they keep saying it's a great replacement for windows xp. But I was surprised that when I joined here that people tell me to switch to Linux Lite, and they don't know of anyone who uses Zorin. (shrugs) I threw away all my Zorin 6 LTS DVDs. But I'm going to download Zorin 8 just out of curiosity. I'm curious to see if they got any of the bugs fixed. The reason why I was running Zorin 6 is because it was a LTS release, which tostoday recommends for beginners.

    I don't think I'm going to do anymore installing until I buy a new computer. Even though you can find people on my youtube explaining he same method I've been using. My results hasn't been good. Sometimes it's hard to decide if the problem lies with the OS or the hardware set up. But the bugs I'm seeing like applets crashing, and tool bar problems, seems to be with what is in the Distro it's self. One issue I found on youtube. The others I haven't looked for yet. I don't know why I didn't think about looking up applet crashes in Zorin. But If I was still trying to run that OS Verison, I would try looking it up.

    I enjoyed listening to his Podcasts. I think I listened to every single one. It was a lot of downloading and converting to mp3s. And then it was a lot a of constant listening for several weeks. But my job is extremely lonely so it helped keep me company as I cleaned the school in the dim light at night.
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    To be truthful, I don't know anyone who uses Zorin full time. Spatry has said he started with it, but quickly adapted to the learning curve. The same is true with me, except I started with Ubuntu, because when a person with no Linux experience, who goes looking for the first time, he or she has Ubuntu shoved down his or her throat. The thing I didn't like about Ubuntu was that you literally have no multimedia support out of the box. I guess Ubuntu doesn't want to step on anyone's toes. Installing the necessary codecs wasn't what I considered difficult, but I can see how it would be a little intimidating, even confusing for a new user that perhaps wasn't a power user with Windows. The other thing was that the entire experience of installing the codecs involved taking you to a website that was obviously obscured, making the whole thing feel like I was committing a crime. I soon learned there are plenty of distros out there that came with these codecs out of the box.

    My experience with open-source did not start with Linux. Before I made the switch, I was already using all the packages I use now, except I had them on Windows. Almost everything that's available on Linux is also available for Windows. I spent some time trolling around on Sourceforge.com

    A few of the packages I use include: Handbrake, Qbittorrent, Thunderbird, MakeMKV, and others. The thing I realized right from the gitgo was that Ubuntu doesn't have any of these in it's stock repos. Again, you have to go and install these repos. Not a big deal, just a little irritating.

    Unfortunately, Zorin is probably a victom of it's own devices. They've dumbed it down to the point that the user doesn't need to even know how to say the word "Linux." As such, you don't see a lot of people on the forums admitting they use it, because the only people using it are on the Zorin forums. I've tried Linux Lite and it's a solid distro. What makes it unique is the custom scripts the developer made to ease the enabling of certain features (which you should really learn how to do....but oh well) One thing I will say is that the developer of Linux Lite is a gamer, meaning his distro will be geared as such. If gaming isn't as important to you, you may find yourself stripping it down somewhat, although it will work just fine if you don't. To be honest though, for anyone who is dead-set on using a Ubuntu/Debian derivative, the choice is clear: Linux Mint (Cinnamon, definitely Cinnamon) is the correct choice. Linux Mint is widely considered "Ubuntu done right." But that's coming from an Arch user.

    Do me a favor, I know this is not protocol, but when you do get the chance write down my email. wchouser3@gmail.com
    When you decide to give it another try, email me and let me know how it goes. I'll even help you step by step if need be.
  • wchouser3 wrote:
    To be truthful, I don't know anyone who uses Zorin full time. Spatry has said he started with it, but quickly adapted to the learning curve. The same is true with me, except I started with Ubuntu, because when a person with no Linux experience, who goes looking for the first time, he or she has Ubuntu shoved down his or her throat. The thing I didn't like about Ubuntu was that you literally have no multimedia support out of the box. I guess Ubuntu doesn't want to step on anyone's toes. Installing the necessary codecs wasn't what I considered difficult, but I can see how it would be a little intimidating, even confusing for a new user that perhaps wasn't a power user with Windows. The other thing was that the entire experience of installing the codecs involved taking you to a website that was obviously obscured, making the whole thing feel like I was committing a crime. I soon learned there are plenty of distros out there that came with these codecs out of the box.

    My experience with open-source did not start with Linux. Before I made the switch, I was already using all the packages I use now, except I had them on Windows. Almost everything that's available on Linux is also available for Windows. I spent some time trolling around on Sourceforge.com

    A few of the packages I use include: Handbrake, Qbittorrent, Thunderbird, MakeMKV, and others. The thing I realized right from the gitgo was that Ubuntu doesn't have any of these in it's stock repos. Again, you have to go and install these repos. Not a big deal, just a little irritating.

    Unfortunately, Zorin is probably a victom of it's own devices. They've dumbed it down to the point that the user doesn't need to even know how to say the word "Linux." As such, you don't see a lot of people on the forums admitting they use it, because the only people using it are on the Zorin forums. I've tried Linux Lite and it's a solid distro. What makes it unique is the custom scripts the developer made to ease the enabling of certain features (which you should really learn how to do....but oh well) One thing I will say is that the developer of Linux Lite is a gamer, meaning his distro will be geared as such. If gaming isn't as important to you, you may find yourself stripping it down somewhat, although it will work just fine if you don't. To be honest though, for anyone who is dead-set on using a Ubuntu/Debian derivative, the choice is clear: Linux Mint (Cinnamon, definitely Cinnamon) is the correct choice. Linux Mint is widely considered "Ubuntu done right." But that's coming from an Arch user.

    Do me a favor, I know this is not protocol, but when you do get the chance write down my email. wchouser3@gmail.com
    When you decide to give it another try, email me and let me know how it goes. I'll even help you step by step if need be.


    Thank you. :)

    I feel that I need to ask for Grace and Mercy. Not just you but everyone on these forums. The unfortunate part is the fact that I have trouble writing perfectly detailed answers. With that said, I'm trying my best.

    I see one thing in your comment that I want to respond too. That doesn't mean I won't respond to the rest later though. I noted it because when I'm ready I will respond to more.

    Every time I read the word Mint, my stomach feels sick. Every time I read the words Mint Cinnamon I throw up. lol The reason why is because I tried Mint Cinnamon 14 and I experienced the worse desktop crash I've ever seen on a computer. The next time I tried Mint Cinnamon 16 and it also melted away.

    Normally I don't post links like these because I don't like to feel overwhelmed. I don't want you to feel overwhelmed either. But if you read the beginning of these two threads you'll see why I dislike Mint. While you read these please keep in mind that I had been duel booting Zorin 6 and Ubuntu 12.04 on the same drive, same computer for a solid month or so. It wasn't perfect but it was working good enough. And they weren't giving extremely bad issues. But Mint on the other hand was a total mess from the very beginning.

    Uh Oh! Linux Mint Cinnamon is crashing already!

    Frustrated: Which Mint is the most stable?
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    Um....well, I can't really comment on mint 14 specifically. I will say this though; anyone who is new to Linux and needs a little time to learn should never install the newest and greatest version. Always go for the "LTS" (long term support) version. This is especailly true with the Ubuntu derivatives because they have a maddenningly short release schedule the LTS version will give you like 5 years of support, whereas the latest release will only give you a few months. This is because those releases are meant for those whom wish to participate in beta-testing, so to speak, though they don't actually come out and admit it. In Mint's case you should use Linux Mint 13 which has support until April 2017 whereas if you would install Mint 16, you'll only have support until July of this year.

    I remember reading somewhere that Mint 14 had some serious problems with it's Kernel. Installing the LTS version in this case will also benefit you and work really well, because it's been out for almost 2 years, giving the developers much more time to work out the bugs.

    Yea, no matter what distro you go with; make sure you go with a LTS version. Now, this will only work with Ubuntu/Fedora/Debian/OpenSUSE based distros. Distros like Arch, Manjaro, Gentoo are "rolling release" meaning every time you execute the update command, you have the latest and greatest release. I still think Manjaro is the way to go. And, it's more fun. Ubuntu keeps you locked up in a "gated garden." That's just my opinion.
  • wchouser3 wrote:
    Um....well, I can't really comment on mint 14 specifically. I will say this though; anyone who is new to Linux and needs a little time to learn should never install the newest and greatest version. Always go for the "LTS" (long term support) version. This is especailly true with the Ubuntu derivatives because they have a maddenningly short release schedule the LTS version will give you like 5 years of support, whereas the latest release will only give you a few months. This is because those releases are meant for those whom wish to participate in beta-testing, so to speak, though they don't actually come out and admit it. In Mint's case you should use Linux Mint 13 which has support until April 2017 whereas if you would install Mint 16, you'll only have support until July of this year.

    I remember reading somewhere that Mint 14 had some serious problems with it's Kernel. Installing the LTS version in this case will also benefit you and work really well, because it's been out for almost 2 years, giving the developers much more time to work out the bugs.

    Yea, no matter what distro you go with; make sure you go with a LTS version. Now, this will only work with Ubuntu/Fedora/Debian/OpenSUSE based distros. Distros like Arch, Manjaro, Gentoo are "rolling release" meaning every time you execute the update command, you have the latest and greatest release. I still think Manjaro is the way to go. And, it's more fun. Ubuntu keeps you locked up in a "gated garden." That's just my opinion.

    I'm fairly aware of the LTS thing now. But back when I was trying Mint I wasn't aware of where to find the LTS version. But I still don't feel comfortable with Mint because anything before release 15 has an update repository issue. The user is actually required to edit a config file to correct the issue. Way the go mint! For someone who is experienced no problem. But what about the poor unsuspecting Newbie? I think they should pull the LTS ISO, fix the problem and then re upload it. But I'm sure that's too much work. :tounge:

    I followed what the guys suggested on the Linux forums and downloaded the Mint 13. They suggested I stay away from Cinnamon. I don't remember what I downloaded but it's not Cinnamon.

    Truth is I really don't care for how Mint looks. To me it looks cheep. I also don't like how any of the Ubuntus look out of the box. To me it's a mix of sick Purple, Orange and Black. I realize they say you can customise how things look but I don't think most newbies are ready for a such an extreme make over.

    I used:

    09_universal_usb_installer_orig_zps48e2d049.png

    To turn my external hard drive into a Zorin 8 Live USB. It's not a LTS release, but a guy on here installed it into a virtual machine for testing. He was trying to figure out why I was having so much trouble with the swap partition. He's confused and I'm confused. LOL

    If you feel like it you can read that thread here:

    Lots of Trouble with System Freezes

    I used it as a live drive all yesterday.

    100_2394_zps065db7db.jpg

    Today I turned it on and got greeted with this error. These errors are really starting to get comical.

    SystemProgramProblemDetected_zpsaae3a7fa.png

    I know, I know, Throw away Zorin. But I wanted to see if they fixed any of the bugs I was experiencing in Zorin 6. It appears to me that they did remove one thing that caused me a major issue. That's at least good, and the applets seem to be more stable.

    In my opinion Spatry and his friends need to stop recommending Zorin to the poor Windows Xp users. From my experience I think Zorin 6 might be a replacement for Windows 98. I also think they should stop recommending Mint anything until they at least get the repository system update issue fixed.

    picture1a_zps58ad6c49.png
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    today I did some looking around. I think I found the perfect one for you. LXLE; it's based on Lubuntu and Ubuntu LTS. It's themed really sharp, and runs really well. I downloaded it and installed it on Virtual Box. I really liked the way it looked and how it was set up.

    You're right. right out of the box, Mint lacks some in terms of looks. You really have to change almost everything about the look and feel to keep from getting blinded by all the silver, white, and bright green. Theming is really easy though, and is pretty much necessary in almost all distros, in my opinion.

    As far as those errors; I never use the graphical tool to update the system. I use the terminal which is much more powerful, and if there's a problem, it tells you what it is. To do so, you have to execute the following two commands:

    sudo apt-get update

    sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

    If that doesn't work, enter this command:

    ping www.google.com

    if you get a message back saying "unknown host" or something like that, you're having an internet connection problem.
  • Last Night at 11:00 at night I read your replies to me in some of my other threads. I felt bad that I haven't been around to respond back. Work and stuff has kept me too tired to get around to doing anything computer. Today due to the snow and bad weather they canceled my job. I'm trying to catch up on my Linux reading (All the articles people on various forums pushed on me as answers to my questions) For example I just got done reading a 19 page print out of "How to use Gparted for Dual boot Win/remove Linux" by Wolfman of the Zorin Forums.

    After reading it I decided to look up the youtube video He suggested... I downloaded it and some other related ones.

    Next I decided to make some screen shots of my current Drive Partitions. Both the Internal and external Hard drive. I'm planning on erasing all these partitions from the External. But I thought you might be interested in seeing how it's currently laid out.

    Internal - This lay out is how it came from the Manufacture.

    MainDriveWindows7Partition_zps3b9cd36a.jpg

    External - I did this so that I could perform a full format on each partition as a way to test the integrity of the Hard Drive.

    ExternalHardDrivePartition01_zps00a09886.jpg
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    why do you have so many partitions on the external drive? Also, I would look into getting rid of the last two on the internal. Those look like maintenance and recovery partitions made by the computer manufacturer. As far as that external....wow....why so many partitions? And, I can't tell by looking at that what file system any of them are. I would definitely erase that puppy and start from scratch.

    Are you at all proficient at partitioning?
  • wchouser3 wrote:
    why do you have so many partitions on the external drive? Also, I would look into getting rid of the last two on the internal. Those look like maintenance and recovery partitions made by the computer manufacturer. As far as that external....wow....why so many partitions? And, I can't tell by looking at that what file system any of them are. I would definitely erase that puppy and start from scratch.

    Are you at all proficient at partitioning?

    I don't want to touch the partitions on the Internal Drive. Since I'm not using it for Linux, why do I haft too? The only way I would use that Internal hard drive for Linux is if I can figure out a new computer for myself.

    My Recovery DVDs. These are two sets. It's called OneKey Recovery. (In case you want to look it up)

    100_2402_zps47422a9a.jpg


    I created those partitions so that I could do a full format on each partition. IN other words, I don't need to leave my computer on for an entire day just to perform a full format. The purpose for the full format is for testing the integrity of the hard drive. Each Partition only takes an hour to format. I never planed on leaving it that way for Linux. Of course for a Live System it doesn't matter because that only uses the first Partition, and the rest is just detected as extra NTFS Drives.

    That last question "Are you at all proficient at partitioning? " feels like a put down.

    ExternalHardDrivePartition02_zps884c0a2c.jpg

    I will get you a gparted screen shot soon.

    I decided to take some pictures of the Bios. Sorry you can't read the headings across the top. They are as follows.

    Information Configuration Security Boot Exit

    Information
    1_zpse8b91978.jpg

    Configuration
    2_zps14f8cb07.jpg

    Security
    3_zps61116743.jpg

    Boot
    4_zpse732ef8a.jpg

    Exit
    5_zps30e50dff.jpg

    Note: The external hard drive wasn't plugged into the system at the time, the pictures were taken.
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    I'm sorry if my question sounded condescending. I was asking because there's a lot of ways to screw it up. You have to be aware of a couple of things. first; with an MS Dos file table (which is what most are) you can have a maximum of 5 primary partitions. This is why most automatic partitioning tools that come as part of the installation create an extended partition, then within that partition, it creates the partitions it needs to run. If you're going to partition by hand, you have to set it up as such. I also wanted to know because there's little tricks to make life easier. For example; you can create a partition that is dedicated to your "Home" directory, that way if you decide to try another distro, you can set it up to mount the home directory that you already created instead of creating a new one. In order to do that, you have to know how to do a couple of things by hand.

    Again, I'm sorry if I offended you, that was not my intention. I just wanted to know how much you knew so that I could help steer you in the right direction.
  • wchouser3 wrote:
    I'm sorry if my question sounded condescending. I was asking because there's a lot of ways to screw it up. You have to be aware of a couple of things. first; with an MS Dos file table (which is what most are) you can have a maximum of 5 primary partitions. This is why most automatic partitioning tools that come as part of the installation create an extended partition, then within that partition, it creates the partitions it needs to run. If you're going to partition by hand, you have to set it up as such. I also wanted to know because there's little tricks to make life easier. For example; you can create a partition that is dedicated to your "Home" directory, that way if you decide to try another distro, you can set it up to mount the home directory that you already created instead of creating a new one. In order to do that, you have to know how to do a couple of things by hand.

    Again, I'm sorry if I offended you, that was not my intention. I just wanted to know how much you knew so that I could help steer you in the right direction.


    100_2403_zps18aafd46.jpg

    I just got done reading this Article. I've also watched various other partition Videos.

    How to use Gparted for dual boot Win/remove Linux

    The only difference between what the guy in the article and what I've been doing is. I created the swap partition at the end of drive. The Root partition at the beginning of the drive. Then I installed the OS to the Root. (NO Home)

    Note: There is a reason why my partitions looked particularly odd to you. After my first Mint Crash, I started experiencing problems with the other two OSes on the hard drive (Zorin and Ubuntu) I decided that I needed to clear the whole thing and start all over. It's a 1TB drive which means it's going to take a very long time to perform a full format. I used windows to create each 50 gig partition and format it. I worked from beginning to end. (Took me several days to do the formatting) When I got to very last partition the drive wouldn't completely format. Scratching my head I started looking online for answers. I found out that some other people had a similar issue with the Western Digital Hard Drives. Just about fed up with it, I went to the Western Digital Website to write them a complaint email. Then I found a firmware update. I downloaded it and installed it to the hard drive unit. Then when I tried to format that last partition it went perfectly. Now every time I have trouble, I double check the end of the drive. So far it passes every time I format it. (3 times total) Next I do the rest of the drive in 50 or 100 gig partitions. I also been running the Western Digital Diagnostic Program over the entire drive and it says it's Ok. (Bad Luck is my Middle name)

    01HardDriveChecksOut_zps10b178b6.jpg

    drivetest3pass_zps172db564.png

    Drivetest3quicktest_zpse5b96050.png

    02HardDriveChecksOut_zpse5578d0e.jpg

    After the firmware updater I no longer get this error. So the drive should be ok.

    Formaterror_zpsfc2ec1e1.jpg

    Right now I'm not concerned with making a home partition. We can do that if you want too. (I'm game if you are) But right now I'm only concerned about finding a distro that stays stable. They say you can run linux on your hardware until it dies. I have no doubt that is true of servers. But honestly I haven't seen anything to convince me that it's even close to true to of the desktops. My Desktop computer (I want to discuss it with you or some of the other people on the forums sometime. But things have been too hard lately so I've stuck to this set up for the time being) has been running Windows vista all of it's life. Since 2007, I've only had to re install Vista 4 times. On this Computer I've only had to re install Windows 7 once. If I hadn't been messing around with somethings those re installs may not have been needed.

    I love Pretty desktops but even that isn't as important as stability. Stability and Not much hard drive space (Not saying I don't have enough I'd prefer more) are the reasons why I haven't pored myself into creating Virtual machines. What good is a Nice looking OS if it's only going to last you a week before you got to re install it? If I could find something stable enough to last me a year, run all my hardware, then I would consider installing it to the internal hard drive.
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    ok....

    have you decided what distro you want to go with?
  • wchouser3 wrote:
    ok....

    have you decided what distro you want to go with?

    You never gave me a link to LXLE I'll download it and give it a try for you. If it doesn't work out then We'll try Manjaro. How does that sound to you? :)
  • MadmanRBMadmanRB Registered
    wchouser3 wrote:
    ok....

    have you decided what distro you want to go with?

    You never gave me a link to LXLE I'll download it and give it a try for you. If it doesn't work out then We'll try Manjaro. How does that sound to you? :)

    Err Manjaro can be tricky if you dont like commandline, again I suggest openSUSE.

    https://www.opensuse.org/en/
  • MadmanRB wrote:
    wchouser3 wrote:
    ok....

    have you decided what distro you want to go with?

    You never gave me a link to LXLE I'll download it and give it a try for you. If it doesn't work out then We'll try Manjaro. How does that sound to you? :)

    Err Manjaro can be tricky if you dont like commandline, again I suggest openSUSE.

    https://www.opensuse.org/en/

    I don't like how people think I'm a command line wuss. When I first learned computers I used the dos command line a lot.

    I think the last time I used the dos command line was when I made a huge mistake of formatting my hard drive when I was trying to format a floppy. After that I stuck to all the graphic ways of doing things except for a few non destructive tasks.

    The only problem I see with the command line is whenever you need to get something done and you need it right away, the command line is awful obscure and slow. When I made that evil mistake I was in a hurry, because I needed to be somewhere. I'd never use a command line to simply copy over mp3 pod casts to my mp3 player.

    If someone wants to guide me through the command line to install something, I am not afraid to try.
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    alright....calm down kids....lol here's the link to lxle:

    http://lxle.net/
  • wchouser3 wrote:
    alright....calm down kids....lol here's the link to lxle:

    http://lxle.net/

    I downloaded the LXLE64bit-12044.torrent but I never used a torrent down loader. What do you recommend?
  • Update for wchouser3

    Like I promised I created screen shots of both the internal and external hard drives under Gparted.

    Internal

    GpartedInternalHardDrive_zps88ec8671.png


    External

    GPartedExternalHardDrive_zps53e49880.png
  • wchouser3wchouser3 Registered
    as long as you tell it to install to the external, you're safe using the auto installer. Are you going to use the entire space for LXLE? and, make sure the boot loader gets installed to the master file table of the drive it's self. Not the partition Linux is installed on. (that too should be automatic) If you're not going to use the entire drive for LXLE, we'll have to do some advanced partitioning either with Gparted or with the partitioning tool included with the installation iso.
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